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How do we look?

By Barry Rochford, strategic communication officer

Since you’re here, you may have had this thought: The website looks different.

Well, you’re right. We’ve updated to a responsive site so it performs better on computers, tablets and phones, and we’ve made some small tweaks that hopefully make the site more visually appealing and easier to navigate.

The former site wasn’t old, per se, but it was created at a time when more people were using desktops and laptops to hop around the Internet. These days, most people are apt to look us up on their phone’s browser instead of sitting down at their desk.

You’ll see that our homepage has changed to emphasize our mission of economic freedom. Since 1981, that has been the reason behind everything we do for young people from birth to age 18. But what is economic freedom? What does that mean to us? The new homepage betters tells that story.

Yet for all the changes, the website has stayed largely the same — and that’s important, because for our grantseekers and grant recipients, our website is where they go to complete their applications and reporting requirements. That’s why the “Apply Now!” and “My Account” buttons continue to be featured prominently at the top of the homepage.

In addition, information about our beliefs, our grantmaking and our proactive initiatives remains unchanged. Those pages are an important resource for visitors to the site who want to learn more about us and our mission, our grantmaking criteria and process, our proactive work, our board and staff, and our founder, Mr. Chester E. Dekko.

I hope you like the updated look. Please feel free to look around, kick the tires (so to speak), and let me know your thoughts and suggestions for making our website even better. You can email me at brochford@dekkofoundation.org or call me at 260-347-1278, ext. 115.

We really like how you think!

 

 

Mr. Dekko left us with two major things.

  • A savings account or endowment that has grown to about $228 million.
  • The mission to foster economic freedom through education.

When we’re at work we talk about economic freedom all the time.  We define it as: “The ultimate liberty to make choices about one’s own life.”  We started wondering if any of you ever think about economic freedom.  Last week we asked our Facebook fans to tell us their definition.  They were pretty impressive–we thought we’d share are few of them here.

My definition of Economic Freedom:

Natalie Reick Axel:  To live a comfortable, independent life with the ability to prepare for the future.

Timothy Bruce:  The freedom to prosper within a country without intervention from a government or economic authority.  individuals are free to secure and protect ones’ own human resources, labor and private property.

Shannon Lowenberg Harper:  Economic freedom is the ability to continually increase the quality of life for yourself, your family and your community by striving to be the best you can be.  To make a difference and serve in any and all ways you can.

Doris Winkler Hobbs:  Economic freedom allows one to be ‘all that he or she can be.’  One can set goals, and have the freedom of striving to attain those goals.  One may choose their occupation or profession to earn they money, then are able to choose to spend that money on material goods or investments…all without the intervention of the government.

Doug Jones:  Having just enough.

Sara McAlexander:  “It is the ability to volunteer and help different people, churches, business and civic organizations, not only in our communities but the state and our country.  Not to have to worry about how your ends are gonna meet so that you can volunteer.

Julie Neas:  The freedom to make an impact on your community.  being able to not only take care of yourself but help others as well.

Renea Salyer:  Economic freedom is peace of mind and the ability to reach your dreams without limitations.

We’re always interested in your take on our mission–so let us know if you have economic freedom thoughts!  dekko@dekkofoundation.org

Walk that talk!!!

It’s easy to suggest that your spouse should exercise and cut out soda.  It’s another thing entirely when you have to lace up your sneakers and avoid the sweet brown fizzy stuff yourself.

It’s called walking the talk.  It’s hard!

At the Dekko Foundation we ask our grantseekers to take a step back from their work and deeply consider what children and young people need to grow and develop.  To be sure that we walk our talk, we’ve stepped back from our work to consider:  What do teens need from us as grantmaking professionals?

We researched teens and their needs, and here’s what we found:

  • After being in school for so many years, teens are a little bit tired of formal learning.  They want to do something hands on!
  • They’re searching for a sense of purpose in their lives.
  • They’re capable of advanced reasoning…think problem solving.
  • They may become philanthropic if led in that direction.

Knowing these things, it seemed natural for us to teach our field of philanthropy to teens.  Our latest video shows what we (and the kids) are learning!

If you know a group of young people who want to make their community a better place, make them aware of our grants for Youthful Eyes and Ideas.